Quaker Tank: Students Compete for $1,250

The Quaker Tank debuted on April 24, and, despite an error in the publicity, the event had a great turnout. The night started with a welcoming commentary by Sue Lucas, an assistant professor of marketing who served as the evening’s moderator. Lucas explained the rules, introduced the judges, and brought out the contestants. The judges included: Brad Heys, Johnathan C. Mckay, Trevor Shoemaker, Paula Stewart, and Sherry Weller. Ryan Wiemken was the first student to pitch his idea. His idea was for a family dairy farm he plans to name…

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Blood in the Water and Money Up for Grabs

Tim Burgoyne, an assistant professor of management, along with his business class students, is hosting an event called “Quaker Tank” in the Hugh G. Heiland Theater on Wednesday, April 24. Doors are scheduled to open at 5 p.m. with the event starting at 6 p.m. Included is free admission, free catered Subway during intermission, and the opportunity to win prizes such as gift cards in a raffle. This brand new event is inspired by the hit TV show “Shark Tank” that airs on ABC. Eight students who dream to have…

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No Offense But: Greek Edition

On November 19th, Wilmington Colleges Sigma Gamma Row Sorority Inc. chapter hosted a ‘No Offense But: Greek Edition’. No Offense But has historically been hosted by Wilmington’s Black Student Initiative (BSI) group as a way to have insight on various groups on campus essentially leading the college to become more accepting of one another. However, this time students would be able to ask question about Greek life, a world that can be full of mystery if you are not a part of it. For the entire week prior, students and…

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Small Town College Students Explore International North African City

Rabat, the capital of Morocco, a seaside country in the northern part of Africa, was recently home to four Wilmington College students and two alumni for the weekend of November 2 to November 5. WC students Amanda Watson, Michael Smith, Jese Shell, Tess Delcamp, and alumni Maraya Wahl and Chris Howard participated in the International Model Arab League (IMAL) hosted at the International University of Rabat. “The experience was everything I had hoped it would be from getting to explore Morocco to the Model Arab League,” says Amanda Watson, senior…

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A Holiday Stuffed with History

Thanksgiving, a holiday most of us think of as a day to stuff our faces, spend time with relatives we never see, and reflect on the aspects of life we are most thankful for; however, the holiday holds a rich history. In 1621, the Plymouth colonists and Wampanoag Indians shared a feast that became known as the first Thanksgiving. The pilgrims have the Native Americans to thank for the skills they learned and surviving the first winter. Squanto taught them how to harvest corn, tap maple from trees, catch fish,…

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Rebooting Our Minds

November is “National Family Literacy Month.” This month reminds families to take some time out of their day and get back into the tradition of reading together. Most of us have fond memories of having a parent read to us as a child; for some of us, this made us become avid readers and critical thinkers. Illiteracy is a growing problem in our nation. The United States ranks 16th in adult reading skills among developed nations. In a democratic society, success depends on an informed citizenry who can efficiently participate…

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Finding Our Radio Voices

Last week was the second meeting of Wilmington College’s new radio station. Headed by Nick Wiget, the college’s new Communication Arts professor, the radio station has been largely organized and funded by him. Right now, its staff is open to anyone who wants to be a part of it. With some big aspirations for future broadcasting, Wiget is ready to get the word out and recruit some more students to the art of broadcasting. Wiget proposes student’s autonomy with their own shows – little supervision with some minor direction from…

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Vaccinate good times, come on! (Let’s Vaccinate)

Recently, there has been a big debate over the safety of vaccines. Some people have been led to belief that vaccinations cause autism; this is faulty information – vaccines are essential and necessary to keep diseases eradicated. Elliot Zieman, Professor of Biology at Wilmington College, said, “Vaccines are the safest and most effective way to prevent infectious diseases. The key to vaccines is the prevention of diseases. Disease prevention means a vaccinated person is protected from acquiring and transmitting the disease.” Because people are choosing not to vaccinate themselves, the…

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There’s a New Place in Town

“Papsy’s Place” is a frozen yogurt and sorbet shop that just opened on West Main Street during mid-July. Unlike any other frozen yogurt place, Papsy’s Place allows you to purchase your cup before you serve yourself. $3 for a four-ounce cup, $5 for a ten-ounce cup, or $7 for a fourteen-ounce cup or homemade waffle cone; Papsy’s Place is quite affordable. The flavors available to choose from change regularly – they can range from pistachio to dragon-fruit sorbet. The first time I visited, mango tart was available and just recently,…

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Like Your Voice, Your Vote Matters

It is important to realize that we are, in fact, born with certain unalienable rights in the United States of America. We are given the opportunity to voice our opinions loud and proud; we are given the right to own firearms; we are given the right to walk freely and not be held as slaves, and slowly but surely… every American citizen was given the right to vote in every, single American election. The right to vote came about after long battles between white males and, well, everyone else who…

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