Making the 1920s Relatable to the 2020s

This past weekend, the Wilmington College Theatre Department presented a production of “Radium Girls” in the Hugh Heiland Theater. The play highlighted a time in the 1920s in which dangerous radium was considered to be a miracle substance safe for everyday use and even capable of curing cancer due to its ability to shrink tumors. The play centers on the “Radium Girls,” a group of female factory workers who worked for the US Radium Corporation. These workers painted watch dials with a radium-based luminous paint used by soldiers during World…

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Getting Wind of What the Honors Program Has Planned.

The Honors Program will embark on a trip to Chicago on April 26. This trip is open to any current Honors student on the Wilmington College main campus. In Chicago, students will be given the opportunity to further their knowledge on an array of topics when visiting venues of their choosing. One of the educational aspects on the itinerary is the Shedd Aquarium. This aquarium is nationally known for its exhibits as well as its educational programs. This activity will be especially enjoyed by the biology majors on the trip,…

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Different, Not Less

The zebra is the official symbol of rare diseases because each zebra’s stripes are unique to them, and each person with a rare disease is unique to them. Thus, the zebra is synonymous Rare Disease Day occurs on Feb. 28 of each year. A rare disease is a disease that affects fewer than 200,000 people. There is more than 7,000 rare diseases that affects 25 million Americas. Most of the people struggling with these rare diseases are children. There is an innate problem – there is very little funding and…

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Upcoming Play to be Radiant

Every spring, Wilmington College puts on their annual play. Last year, Wynn Alexander directed “Early Dark,” a story about a young southern woman and man, the passion (or lack thereof) between the two, and the complications of their relationship. The play was very well received by its audiences, mostly due to the fresh faces that entered the Theatre Department. This year, Alexander has decided to direct “Radium Girls,” a smash hit in high schools and colleges nationwide as well as a successful documentary on Amazon Video. The show brings attention…

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What We Witnessed in 2018

 2018 brought a lot of new, exciting, innovative, and world-changing events. Let us look at some of them! Music: Some of the most popular songs of the year include: Thank u, Next by Ariana Grande This is America by Childish Gambino I Like It by Cardi B Never Be The Same by Camila Cabello High Hopes by Panic! At the Disco Movies: Popular movies of 2018 include: A Quiet Place BlacKkKlansman Black Panther Incredibles 2 Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom Sports: There were many exciting sporting events this past year, some…

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A Holiday Stuffed with History

Thanksgiving, a holiday most of us think of as a day to stuff our faces, spend time with relatives we never see, and reflect on the aspects of life we are most thankful for; however, the holiday holds a rich history. In 1621, the Plymouth colonists and Wampanoag Indians shared a feast that became known as the first Thanksgiving. The pilgrims have the Native Americans to thank for the skills they learned and surviving the first winter. Squanto taught them how to harvest corn, tap maple from trees, catch fish,…

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Adding More Chairs to the Kitchen Table

Amnesty International is putting on a dinner and discussion on Wednesday, November 14, at 7- 8:30 p.m. in dining rooms C & D to discuss immigration and the struggles of refugees. This “Longer Table” dinner is set to promote building a longer table for more people to gather at and interact, rather than shutting people out. There will be two speakers present for the dinner and discussion. Sarah Huffman, a volunteer from CRIS (Community Refugee & Immigration Services), and Murtadha Al-Shaikhli, a refugee. They will discuss immigration and give real-life…

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November: National Adoption Month

November is a time that most of us consider to be the beginning of festivities, home cooked meals, and giving thanks. November isn’t only about Thanksgiving, however. It is also National Adoption Month, and one of the main focuses throughout this month is the adoption of children currently in foster care. In 1976, the Massachusetts Governor, Mike Dukakis, initiated “Adoption Week.” This was the first major effort to promote adoption and the need to get children out of the foster care system. The popularity for promoting adoption soon grew, and…

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Vaccinate good times, come on! (Let’s Vaccinate)

Recently, there has been a big debate over the safety of vaccines. Some people have been led to belief that vaccinations cause autism; this is faulty information – vaccines are essential and necessary to keep diseases eradicated. Elliot Zieman, Professor of Biology at Wilmington College, said, “Vaccines are the safest and most effective way to prevent infectious diseases. The key to vaccines is the prevention of diseases. Disease prevention means a vaccinated person is protected from acquiring and transmitting the disease.” Because people are choosing not to vaccinate themselves, the…

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