Monday, 19/11/2018 | 10:47 UTC-5
The Witness Newspaper

The Need to Step Back: Three Perspectives

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WC Senior Perspective: Kara Griffith, studying Criminal Justice

I think the major [life change] for seniors after graduation is going from a sporadic, packed schedule of social events, community service, classes, sporting events and meetings to a more settled schedule revolving around a traditional work schedule. No longer will I be up until 3am writing extensive research papers, or unfortunately have the opportunity to nap at 1 in the afternoon. Having this busy and sporadic schedule has definitely taught me how to manage time better as well how to be flexible when that fails. After graduation I still plan on being heavily involved in my community and social activities, which will keep me just as busy, but I hope to be able to have a more structured and consistent schedule.

Having this busy and sporadic schedule has definitely taught me how to manage time better as well how to be flexible when that fails.

WC Alumni Perspective: Ashley Fox, Graduate Studies in Rhetoric and Writing at Wright State University, WC class of 2016

If you are considering a Master’s degree or Ph.D program in the future, your undergraduate career, specifically your senior year, is where you should practice the skills needed for higher education. Think about the hardest class you had to take for your undergraduate; it’s probably a senior seminar course or capstone for your major. Multiply the work load, the academic rigor, and the amount of time you put into that class by about 3–that’s graduate school. Also think about the amount of stress that one class may have caused you. What was stressful about it? How did you deal with it? Were you organized and prepared? Did you procrastinate? You must be able to manage your time, organize your materials, and stay on track. The work and the expectations are much harder and you have a lot more to lose if you are riding on a scholarship or teaching assistantship. With such high stakes–it may be even easier to feel even more stressed and overwhelmed. Know yourself, take care of your body and mind. Know when to cut back in other areas of your life like relationships, jobs, organizations, extracurriculars. Know when to work ahead and when to take breaks. Graduate school is an immense and intense study of your field of interest– You may be working towards a master’s degree for your field of interest, say education or business. But you’re also truly becoming a master of yourself–knowing yourself as a student, a researcher, a scholar to the field, a teacher, and your unique self.

But you’re also truly becoming a master of yourself–knowing yourself as a student, a researcher, a scholar to the field, a teacher, and your unique self.

WC Professor Perspective: Paul Moke, Professor of Political Science and Criminal Justice

To relax and unwind, I often try to do a long workout, either in the pool or on my bicycle.  I get away and come home a little tired and sore. That makes it easy to get a good night’s sleep.  Sometimes I even get new insights as I exercise. My trainer, Linda Tecklenburg, used to say that was because of all the oxygenated blood getting to the brain (she’s probably right about that).  Other times I focus on hobbies, like playing guitar or working with my hands on home improvement projects or cars. Anything that gets my mind and body away from the academic work for a few hours seems to do the trick.  Then I can return with new ideas and a fresh mind.

[Students need a break because] most academic work involves different stages, like studying for an exam or writing a term paper.  Rather than cramming for hours or trying to edit a paper with a tired mind after spending all evening writing, build in enough time to get away from it, if only for an evening.  Usually people perform better and have deeper insights when they come back to the job the next day with a rested mind.

Rather than cramming for hours or trying to edit a paper with a tired mind after spending all evening writing, build in enough time to get away from it, if only for an evening.

Maraya Wahl
About

Editor of the Witness. Maraya is a senior majoring in Business Management and Political Science and minoring in Spanish. She is a member of Kappa Delta and involved in many ways on campus. She believes that writing is a wonderful way to communicate and express oneself to others.

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