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Theft Arises on Campus

A.J. Ganger

Chief Editor 

Everyone around campus and the world knows about the events that took place at the Gobbler house on Halloween. Little do others know that there is a bigger issue happening on our very own campus. On the weekend of November 9th and 10th, a series of apartment in the commons were broken into. The person responsible for this left no sign of forced entry. The other sketchy part of these break-ins is that the person only stole one or two items from these apartments. “The person took my NCAA Football 14 and my Call Of Duty Ghosts video games.” Said Matt Stooksberry, a junior here at Wilmington College. When asked if these were the only items taken he responded with a simple yes.

On Monday evening after watching a television show I thought it would be a great idea to go and play my personal copy of NCAA Football 14. As I was looking for my game I realized that it was nowhere to be found. After asking my roommate what had happened I call my RA, Austin Anderson. I told him that my game had been stolen and that someone had broken into my apartment. “Call Campus Safety and report the theft. There were others who got games stolen this weekend as well. I have even had an IPod and my GPS stolen out of my car.” Said Anderson. After I went and talked to housing about this issue, I was informed that they had no knowledge about the series of break ins that took place. The only way that the individual could’ve gotten into a locked apartment, that includes the back door being locked, is to have a key to the apartments. Not just any key, but some kind of master key that, campus safety, physical plant, and the housing offices have in their possessions. The keys given out to the students shouldn’t be duplicated, which rules out any possibility of copying any keys. “I’m sure that the person who stole these games have already turned them into GameStop.” Stated Stooksberry. After doing some research on how game returns work at GameStop “a costumers that has more than one copy of the same game cannot trade that game in more than once during one transaction.” Stated Mark Dyar, a manger at a GameStop store in the Dayton area.

In talking with Mike Albright, head of the housing office, he said, “over thanksgiving and Christmas breaks we will be having a commons watch.” This means that there will be someone watching the apartments to ensure nothing happens to any student’s possessions. One question that should be asked is how is the housing office and campus safety going to handle these thefts? Will the students that had the games stolen ever get those games returned to them? With the prices of video games being in the high sixties for one game, those students including myself are now out that money and maybe never get to see those games ever again. The only way at this point that those games will be returned is to go out to GameStop and pay $65 or so more, just to get a copy of a game that they had already paid for and someone had selfishly broken into an apartment and stolen that game or games from them. Also, whose is there to say that the same thing won’t happen over break when no one is on campus? What if students are sleeping when someone breaks into their apartments and something worse happens to a student? This is a major safety concern for us as students that live in the commons and right now this campus doesn’t seem to safe to live.

As students on this beautiful campus, we need to be aware of who is in our apartments and to know just who has keys to our apartments. Make sure to keep your doors locked at all times and just hope and pray that someone doesn’t key into your apartment and take any of your items that you’ve worked so hard to have. This issue needs to be taken care of immediately before someone gets hurt or injured.

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